the brewer and the brewed


THE BEERS

Brewed to highlight the finest locally sourced ingredients.


Mishabooz

8.9% ABV / 88 IBU / XXX Extra Stout


A black brew powered by Michigan Zeus, Nugget and Chinook hops, with healthy additions of flaked oats, malted wheat, roasted barley, black and chocolate malts, smoked malt, dark crystal malt, and even a bit of brown sugar. The alleged medicinal benefits of Mishabooz -- a result of heavy additions of Humulus Lupulus Cannabinaceae – are as yet scientifically unproven.



Woodruff's Porter

7.1% ABV / 98 IBU / Smoked Honey Porter


Before Ypsilanti , the town was called Woodruff’s Grove and porter was the most popular beer in the world. Our Woodruff’s Porter hearkens back to the time when coppers were fired with flavorful smoky hardwoods and honey was a commonly added treat. Seven different malts, led by traditional Maris Otter, combine with Fuggle and East Kent Golding hops to bring you a taste of the ale that was brewed 150 years ago.



Mooneye IPA

6.6% ABV / 80 IBU / IPA


Our friends at Hop Head Farms in Hickory Corners, Michigan collaborated with the Ypsi Alehouse to brew this truly zingy IPA, a bombshell of Michigan Zeus, Chinook and Cascade hops



Isle Royale

5.7% ABV / 35 IBU / Amber Ale


A full base of aromatic, Munich and biscuit malt pushes Isle Royale into the amber range while retaining the hoppy sock of an American IPA. So we’ve invented a whole new category -try it.



Blue Racer

6.4% ABV / 0 IBU / Michigan Blueberry Honeywheat


Malted wheat and barley from Pilot House Malt in Byron Center in the mash. Centennials from Top Hops in Goodrich for a fragrant dry-hopped nose. Honey from the Windmill Hill Farm in Croswell. Michigan-grown blueberries diving, ascending and hovering in our kinetic beer sculpture. Blue Racer is one of the only brews you’ll find with 100% of the ingredients made in Michigan! The Blue Racer name comes from a native Michigan snake. These non-venomous snakes have been found through most of the lower pennisula.



JimmyJack's Normal Beer

5.8% ABV / 15 IBU / American XPA


German Barke Pils malt and Northern Brewer hops lend a Bohemian flavor to our smooth, easygoing JimmyJack’s Normal XPA. A tribute to Ypsilanti’s first major college, the Michigan State Normal College, which preceded EMU.



Deja Brew

6.4% ABV / 32 IBU / American Brown


A hint of chocolate combines with a substantial brown malt background and Zythos hops from Oregon. Our zingy, dry Deja Brew transports you unexpectedly back to another time – but in the same space. Maybe you’ve been here before?



Ypsi Tickle

9.8% ABV / 50 IBU / English Strong Ale


Ypsi Tickle is an English-style Strong Ale with complex, malty character and toffee tones. This smooth winter warmer features real torched bourbon Madagascar vanilla, American malt and Michigan Hops. Essex yeast gives Ypsi Tickle an English flair.



Smeet Frog

5.2% ABV / 82 IBU / Session IPA


Smeet Frog is a refreshing and hoppy session India Pale Ale enriched with white wheat malt. It is named after the legendary and very rare Smeet Frog species discovered by Ypsilanti’s mysterious Mr. Dodd. These reclusive furry frogs are only spotted once in a blue moon, late at night in Frog Island and Riverside Parks. Smeet Frog Ale is great for the hot days of summer! Try it - it’ll make you hoppy!!!



Scary Pumpkin

5.4% ABV / 7 IBU / Pumpkin Ale


Scary Pumpkin is inspired by Maude Mae Duffy Bailey, the world's greatest piemaker --and Ted's grandma. She always requested a full head to filter her beer. We baked lots of pumpkin and tossed in liberal doses of fresh ginger root, orange peel, dark molasses, cinnamon sticks and nutmeg. So here's to you, grandma! We're drinking your pumpkin pie in every glass.



Ted Badgerow,
Brewmeister with an Attitude



Brewer Ted Badgerow, Ypsi Alehouse co-owners Ted Badgerow and David Roberts


... and why not? He's had plenty of time to work on it.

"My brewing epiphany came in 1979 in the midst of an annual solo bicycle ride from Muskegon to Ann Arbor, where my wife and I worked at the University of Michigan. A bit after noon on a hot summer day, I wheeled up to the house of my best friend and music partner Jim Rouse. "You look hot," Jim said. "Have a beer?"

I made quick work of a delicious brown beer and remarked, "You must have gotten a raise, you"re buying the imports now." "No," said Jim. "I brewed it myself."

That galvanizing moment was the genesis of my brewing career. Home-brewing had just been legalized in the United States. I was cooking professionally for forty hungry sisters at a U of M sorority and later supervised the University Club kitchen, so brewing seemed the next logical step. After numerous basement experiments people began to enjoy my homebrewed ales and suggested I start a brewery.

...we raised $12,000 from investors and formed Michigan's first modern craft brewery, The Real Ale Co. Inc... I'm proud to have been one of the first fermenters of the Great American Beer Revolution
So in partnership with longtime friend and former dairy farmer Gordon Averill, we raised $12,000 from investors and formed Michigan"s first modern craft brewery, The Real Ale Co. Inc., in the historic clock tower building in Chelsea MI. The brewery was licensed in 1982, one of 41 brewing companies that existed in the US at that time. The only other breweries in Michigan were Stroh"s and Frankenmuth.

The terms "craft beer" and "brewpub" and "microbrewery" were unknown at the time. Michigan brewers were not allowed to sell for consumption on the premises until the mid-1990"s, but we were allowed to give away free samples. At that time over 97% of the beer consumed by the American public was pale lager. A few imported – mostly European -- beers were available, but we were the only brewery in the Midwest selling real ales produced locally in small batches, and I'm proud to have been one of the first fermenters of the Great American Beer Revolution. As Michigan"s first new brewery in thirty-eight years, The Real Ale Company was featured in newspapers, on TV stations, in a Time Magazine article, and in the Brewers Digest. We sold as much beer as we could brew at $20 per case -- about $6 per case less than it cost to produce. When we ceased production in 1984, a young fellow named Larry Bell was so enamoured with brewing that he bought our brew kettle and started a tiny brewery in Kalamazoo. I returned to home brewing and eventually helped start the Ann Arbor Brewers Guild — an association of home brewers.

Since then, and with a faster pace more recently, the old American lager beer monoculture has been giving way to a vibrant community of over 4,000 breweries nationwide, producing every imaginable variety of fermented beverage. To me, the most striking features of our craft beer movement are the adventurous bursting of traditional beer boundaries and the remarkable spirit of cooperation, collaboration and collegiality shared by small brewers. Dozens of them have welcomed me into their brewhouses, shown me their facilities, answered my many questions, and shared some mighty fine brews. To them, Dave Roberts and I owe a debt of gratitude that can only be returned by serving you the finest locally produced beers we can possibly brew. That is Mishigama"s pledge to you."

It"s great to be back!
Ted Badgerow, Head Brewer
Mishigama Craft Brewing/Ypsi Alehouse